News FIDE

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 7



Round 7 Results


SNo.   Name Rtg Res.   Name Rtg SNo. 4 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs 2346 ½ - ½ GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 5 WGM L'ami Alina 2446 ½ - ½ GM Danielian Elina 2490 3 6 WGM Muminova Nafisa 2315 0 - 1 WGM Ju Wenjun 2559 2 7 GM Hou Yifan 2661 1 - 0 GM Zhu Chen 2461 1 8 GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 ½ - ½ GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 9 GM Koneru Humpy 2598 1 - 0 GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10

RESULTS after Round 7

Photo Gallery



Round 6: Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan improved their lead

In the sixth round of the Women Grand Prix in Sharjah both Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan won their games against Alina L’Ami and Anna Ushenina respectivly. It was a lucky day for the Chinese players as the third participant from China Zhao Xue also won today. She defeated Humpy Koneru, who suffered the third loss in the tournament and has very few chances to catch Hou Yifan. After sixth rounds World Champion has increased the distance to 3 points.

After painful loss at the fifth round, Tatiana Kosintseva managed to win against Harika Dronavalli. The games Danielian-Tuvshintugs and Zhu-Muminova finished in a draw. 

SNo.   Name Rtg Res.   Name Rtg SNo. 12 GM Zhao Xue 2508 1 - 0 GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 10 GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 1 - 0 GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 11 GM Ushenina Anna 2487 0 - 1 GM Hou Yifan 2661 7 1 GM Zhu Chen 2461 ½ - ½ WGM Muminova Nafisa 2315 6 2 WGM Ju Wenjun 2559 1 - 0 WGM L'ami Alina 2446 5 3 GM Danielian Elina 2490 ½ - ½ WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs 2346 4

Read full report here

RESULTS after Round 6


Photo Gallery



Round 5: two Chinese Hou Yifan and Ju Wenjun at the top

There were two decisive games and four draws in the fifth round of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The sole leader after four rounds, Ju Wenjun, was the first one to finish her game. Her opponent Batchimeg Tuvshintugs decided not to check her luck today and the players repeated the moves in the middle game. Elina Danielian relatively quickly outplayed Zhao Xue, while World Champion Hou Yifan defeated Tatiana Kosintseva after long and complex fight. Indian derby between Humpy Koneru and Harika Dronavalli as well as the game Ushenina-Muminova finished in a draw. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen split a point and thus both players have stopped the unfortunate series of losses.

After 5 rounds Chinese Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan are leading with 4 points. Three players Batchimeg Tuvshintugs. Anna Ushenina and Harika Dronavalli share the third place with 3, 5 points out of 5.

The distance between two players, who fight for the victory in Grand Prix Series Hou Yifan and Humpy Koneru, increased to two points. 

SNo.   Name Rtg Res.   Name Rtg SNo. 3 GM Danielian Elina 2490 1 - 0 GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 4 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs 2346 ½ - ½ WGM Ju Wenjun 2559 2 5 WGM L'ami Alina 2446 ½ - ½ GM Zhu Chen 2461 1 6 WGM Muminova Nafisa 2315 ½ - ½ GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 7 GM Hou Yifan 2661 1 - 0 GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 8 GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 ½ - ½ GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9


RESULTS after Round 5

Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery


Round 4: Ju Wenjun takes lead


In a dramatic fourth round Ju Wenjun beat Elina Danielian to grab solo lead with 3½ points in the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. In the battle of the two top seeds, Hou Yifan, playing black, defeated Humpy Koneru, who unexpectedly lost the drawish endgame. Tatiana Kosintseva had winning position against Nafisa Muminova but missed advantage in the time trouble. The game finished in a draw same as another encounter between Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue. Another drama happened in the game Zhu Chen – Batchimeg Tuvshintugs. Qatari player had better position during the whole game but didn’t play well in the rook endgame and even lost the game at the end. Alina L’Ami suffered another loss, this time against Anna Ushenina. Women’s World Champion Hou Yifan of China, Harika Dronavalli of India, former women’s world champion Anna Ushenina of Ukraine and WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs of Mongolia follow the leader with 3 points each.


Ju Wenjun 1-0 Elina Danielian

Humpy Koneru 0-1 Hou Yifan

Anna Ushenina 1-0 Alina L’Ami

Zhu Chen 0-1 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Zhao Xue 1/2-1/2 Harika Dronavalli

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Nafisa Muminova

RESULTS after Round 4

Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery


Round 3: Harika Dronavalli and Ju Wenjun are leading


Ju Wenjun defeated her compatriot Zhao Xue today to catch up Harika Dronavalli, who made a draw against World Champion Hou Yifan. Humpy Koneru and Nafisa Muminova played a dramatic game, which finished in a draw but not before both players missed good chances to win. Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Anna Ushenina played a relatively quiet game and split a point just before the first time control. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen lost the third game in a row against Tatiana Kosintseva and Elina Danielian respectively.

Ju Wenjun 1-0 Zhao Xue

Danielian, Elina 1-0 Zhu Chen

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Kosintseva, Tatiana

Muminova, Nafisa ½-½ Koneru Humpy

Hou Yifan ½-½ Dronavalli Harika


Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery




Round 2: Harika Dronavalli takes early lead

Harika Dronavalli from India defeated Nafisa Muminova from Uzbekistan to become the sole leader after two rounds of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. Her compatriot Humpy Koneru managed to recover after unfortunate start and confidently won against Alina L’Ami. There were two more decisive games as Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun outplayed Elina Danielian and Zhu Chen respectively. Hou Yifan split a point with Zhao Xue and one more game between Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Tatiana Kosintseva also finished in a draw. Five players including Hou Yifan, Zhao Xue, Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun are half a point behind the leader.

Zhao Xue 1/2 – 1/2 Hou Yifan

The Chinese derby didn’t last for too long today and after one hour of play the peace has been signed. The theoretical line led to a known repetition and both players seemed satisfied with the final result. Speaking about interest of Chinese media towards Women Grand Prix event, Hou Yifan pointed out that after such a great success of Chinese Team at the Olympiad the attention of media turned to chess once again and Grand Prix event will be followed closely in China. At the same time both players of Chinese Women’s Team seemed unsatisfied with their own result in Tromso. “We have good chances to win this Olympiad as well as a previous one but for some reason we are always second”, said Zhao Xue.

Humpy Koneru 1-0 Alina L’Ami

It ‘s not an easy task to play against two best Indian women players in two days and Alina L’Ami suffered another loss today. There was an opportunity for Romanian player to exchange her knight for White’s light-square bishop but all the same Black got solid position after the opening. The critical moment of this game was perhaps at move 26 when Black didn’t play 26…Ne2 allowing her opponent to win an important pawn on the King’s side. It was just a question of technique from Humpy Koneru and she didn’t give any chance to her opponent.

Ushenina Anna 1-0 Elina Danielian

Anna Ushenina and Elina Danielian could have finished the game around 30th move but both players missed 30.g4 in the time trouble.

However the position was still in White’s favor but Danielian found the right moment to complicate the position after a piece sacrifice. Black managed to get 3 pawns for one piece, and in fact at one moment Black could draw the game with a nice move but failed to find the precise way.

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Once again Tatiana tried her luck in Ruy Lopez against Batchimeg but this time she chose 5.Bc6 comapere to 5.c3 as she played in the previous stage of Grand Prix In Khanty-Manskiysk. Same as before Russian player put a lot of pressure on her opponent but once again Batchimeg showed good defensive skills and managed to hold the position.

In order to complicate things White sacrificed a pawn on a5 even it was not so clear if she has enough compensation. Nevertheless Black found another way to keep the balance and after 45 moves the game finished in a draw.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Ju Wenjun

It was a very interesting and complex game with many different opportunities for both sides. Ju Wenjun played aggressively on the King’s side but her opponent kept calm till some moment and was holding the pressure. The game became extremely sharp after 23…f5, and every move was crucial. One of the critical moments happened on move 24 when Zhu Chen decided to change her dark square bishop for the knight. Ju Wenjun continued to fight for initiative and in the time trouble it seemed more difficult for White to find the exact moves.

Harika Dronavalli 1-0 Nafisa Muminova

Harika tried to avoid theoretical lines today and didn’t get anything out of the opening. As she pointed out at the press conference, she was not happy with her play at the early stage of the game and after 17…f5 and 18…c5 she estimated her position as slightly worse. It’s hard to say how Black could have improved her play but as in the previous game Harika showed better understanding of the position. She competently changed few pieces and started to play against black weaknesses. When Nafisa moved her queen on the Queen’s side Harika used a chance to create crashing attack on the weak king of her opponent. 

Official website

Photo Gallery

Cross table after Round 2




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

SportAccord Mind Games 2014: UPDATED Final List of Players



FIDE publishes the corrected list of players who have been selected to participate in the SportAccord Mind Games 2014:

1. MEN

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 13300474 Aronian, Levon ARM GM 1982 2822,7 2805 2850 2813 4126025 Grischuk, Alexander RUS GM 1983 2800,3 2795 2778 2828 4168119 Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS GM 1990 2793,7 2730 2880 2771 13401319 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE GM 1985 2768,7 2743 2824 2739 623539 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA GM 1990 2757,0 2766 2777 2728 14100010 Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR GM 1969 2755,3 2735 2720 2811 3503240 Dominguez Perez, Leinier CUB GM 1983 2750,3 2760 2728 2763 14103320 Ponomariov, Ruslan UKR GM 1983 2739,7 2723 2758 2738 13400924 Radjabov, Teimour AZE GM 1987 2738,3 2724 2715 2776 2805677 Gelfand, Boris ISR GM 1968 2732,3 2753 2719 2725 703303 Leko, Peter HUN GM 1979 2730,7 2737 2682 2773 605506 Bacrot, Etienne FRA GM 1983 2730,0 2720 2739 2731 24116068 Giri, Anish NED GM 1994 2727,0 2750 2757 2674 8601429 Wang, Yue CHN GM 1987 2720,7 2715 2682 2765 1118358 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL GM 1987 2720,0 2733 2743 2684 8602883 Wang, Hao CHN GM 1989 2714,3 2730 2694 2719

No more than two players from each federation have been selected.


Top Reserves in case replacements for Russian players are needed:

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 14109603 Karjakin, Sergey RUS GM 1990 2774,7 2786 2732 2806 4102142 Svidler, Peter RUS GM 1976 2766,7 2751 2756 2793


Top Reserves in case replacements from other federations are needed:

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 5007003 Harikrishna, P. IND GM 1986 2718,3 2726 2728 2701 2000024 Kamsky, Gata USA GM 1974 2716,7 2717 2704 2729



2. WOMEN

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 8602980 Hou, Yifan CHN GM 1994 2630,3 2629 2662 2600 14111330 Muzychuk, Anna UKR GM 1990 2590,7 2561 2665 2546 5008123 Koneru, Humpy IND GM 1987 2581,7 2613 2521 2611 13601903 Dzagnidze, Nana GEO GM 1987 2559,7 2541 2591 2547 4128125 Kosteniuk, Alexandra RUS GM 1984 2552,7 2533 2548 2577 2902257 Stefanova, Antoaneta BUL GM 1979 2545,0 2488 2569 2578 4167570 Gunina, Valentina RUS GM 1989 2543,3 2501 2577 2552 8601283 Zhao, Xue CHN GM 1985 2534,3 2542 2576 2485 8603006 Ju, Wenjun CHN WGM 1991 2520,7 2538 2469 2555 4133471 Kosintseva, Tatiana RUS GM 1986 2519,7 2476 2578 2505 4641833 Paehtz, Elisabeth GER IM 1985 2487,7 2456 2522 2485 5015197 Harika, Dronavalli IND GM 1991 2486,3 2513 2525 2421 14110911 Ushenina, Anna UKR GM 1985 2481,3 2488 2467 2489 14114550 Muzychuk, Mariya UKR IM 1992 2468,3 2521 2439 2445 13602640 Khotenashvili, Bela GEO GM 1988 2461,0 2518 2447 2418 1700030 Cramling, Pia SWE GM 1963 2455,7 2491 2433 2443


The list occurred automatically based on the received contracts.

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 6



Round 6: Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan improved their lead

In the sixth round of the Women Grand Prix in Sharjah both Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan won their games against Alina L’Ami and Anna Ushenina respectivly. It was a lucky day for the Chinese players as the third participant from China Zhao Xue also won today. She defeated Humpy Koneru, who suffered the third loss in the tournament and has very few chances to catch Hou Yifan. After sixth rounds World Champion has increased the distance to 3 points.

After painful loss at the fifth round, Tatiana Kosintseva managed to win against Harika Dronavalli. The games Danielian-Tuvshintugs and Zhu-Muminova finished in a draw. 

SNo.   Name Rtg Res.   Name Rtg SNo. 12 GM Zhao Xue 2508 1 - 0 GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 10 GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 1 - 0 GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 11 GM Ushenina Anna 2487 0 - 1 GM Hou Yifan 2661 7 1 GM Zhu Chen 2461 ½ - ½ WGM Muminova Nafisa 2315 6 2 WGM Ju Wenjun 2559 1 - 0 WGM L'ami Alina 2446 5 3 GM Danielian Elina 2490 ½ - ½ WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs 2346 4

RESULTS after Round 6

Photo Gallery

 



Round 5: two Chinese Hou Yifan and Ju Wenjun at the top

There were two decisive games and four draws in the fifth round of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The sole leader after four rounds, Ju Wenjun, was the first one to finish her game. Her opponent Batchimeg Tuvshintugs decided not to check her luck today and the players repeated the moves in the middle game. Elina Danielian relatively quickly outplayed Zhao Xue, while World Champion Hou Yifan defeated Tatiana Kosintseva after long and complex fight. Indian derby between Humpy Koneru and Harika Dronavalli as well as the game Ushenina-Muminova finished in a draw. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen split a point and thus both players have stopped the unfortunate series of losses.

After 5 rounds Chinese Ju Wenjun and Hou Yifan are leading with 4 points. Three players Batchimeg Tuvshintugs. Anna Ushenina and Harika Dronavalli share the third place with 3, 5 points out of 5.

The distance between two players, who fight for the victory in Grand Prix Series Hou Yifan and Humpy Koneru, increased to two points. 

SNo.   Name Rtg Res.   Name Rtg SNo. 3 GM Danielian Elina 2490 1 - 0 GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 4 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs 2346 ½ - ½ WGM Ju Wenjun 2559 2 5 WGM L'ami Alina 2446 ½ - ½ GM Zhu Chen 2461 1 6 WGM Muminova Nafisa 2315 ½ - ½ GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 7 GM Hou Yifan 2661 1 - 0 GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 8 GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 ½ - ½ GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9


RESULTS after Round 5

Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery


Round 4: Ju Wenjun takes lead


In a dramatic fourth round Ju Wenjun beat Elina Danielian to grab solo lead with 3½ points in the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. In the battle of the two top seeds, Hou Yifan, playing black, defeated Humpy Koneru, who unexpectedly lost the drawish endgame. Tatiana Kosintseva had winning position against Nafisa Muminova but missed advantage in the time trouble. The game finished in a draw same as another encounter between Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue. Another drama happened in the game Zhu Chen – Batchimeg Tuvshintugs. Qatari player had better position during the whole game but didn’t play well in the rook endgame and even lost the game at the end. Alina L’Ami suffered another loss, this time against Anna Ushenina. Women’s World Champion Hou Yifan of China, Harika Dronavalli of India, former women’s world champion Anna Ushenina of Ukraine and WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs of Mongolia follow the leader with 3 points each.


Ju Wenjun 1-0 Elina Danielian

Humpy Koneru 0-1 Hou Yifan

Anna Ushenina 1-0 Alina L’Ami

Zhu Chen 0-1 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Zhao Xue 1/2-1/2 Harika Dronavalli

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Nafisa Muminova

RESULTS after Round 4

Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery


Round 3: Harika Dronavalli and Ju Wenjun are leading


Ju Wenjun defeated her compatriot Zhao Xue today to catch up Harika Dronavalli, who made a draw against World Champion Hou Yifan. Humpy Koneru and Nafisa Muminova played a dramatic game, which finished in a draw but not before both players missed good chances to win. Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Anna Ushenina played a relatively quiet game and split a point just before the first time control. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen lost the third game in a row against Tatiana Kosintseva and Elina Danielian respectively.

Ju Wenjun 1-0 Zhao Xue

Danielian, Elina 1-0 Zhu Chen

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Kosintseva, Tatiana

Muminova, Nafisa ½-½ Koneru Humpy

Hou Yifan ½-½ Dronavalli Harika


Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery




Round 2: Harika Dronavalli takes early lead

Harika Dronavalli from India defeated Nafisa Muminova from Uzbekistan to become the sole leader after two rounds of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. Her compatriot Humpy Koneru managed to recover after unfortunate start and confidently won against Alina L’Ami. There were two more decisive games as Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun outplayed Elina Danielian and Zhu Chen respectively. Hou Yifan split a point with Zhao Xue and one more game between Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Tatiana Kosintseva also finished in a draw. Five players including Hou Yifan, Zhao Xue, Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun are half a point behind the leader.

Zhao Xue 1/2 – 1/2 Hou Yifan

The Chinese derby didn’t last for too long today and after one hour of play the peace has been signed. The theoretical line led to a known repetition and both players seemed satisfied with the final result. Speaking about interest of Chinese media towards Women Grand Prix event, Hou Yifan pointed out that after such a great success of Chinese Team at the Olympiad the attention of media turned to chess once again and Grand Prix event will be followed closely in China. At the same time both players of Chinese Women’s Team seemed unsatisfied with their own result in Tromso. “We have good chances to win this Olympiad as well as a previous one but for some reason we are always second”, said Zhao Xue.

Humpy Koneru 1-0 Alina L’Ami

It ‘s not an easy task to play against two best Indian women players in two days and Alina L’Ami suffered another loss today. There was an opportunity for Romanian player to exchange her knight for White’s light-square bishop but all the same Black got solid position after the opening. The critical moment of this game was perhaps at move 26 when Black didn’t play 26…Ne2 allowing her opponent to win an important pawn on the King’s side. It was just a question of technique from Humpy Koneru and she didn’t give any chance to her opponent.

Ushenina Anna 1-0 Elina Danielian

Anna Ushenina and Elina Danielian could have finished the game around 30th move but both players missed 30.g4 in the time trouble.

However the position was still in White’s favor but Danielian found the right moment to complicate the position after a piece sacrifice. Black managed to get 3 pawns for one piece, and in fact at one moment Black could draw the game with a nice move but failed to find the precise way.

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Once again Tatiana tried her luck in Ruy Lopez against Batchimeg but this time she chose 5.Bc6 comapere to 5.c3 as she played in the previous stage of Grand Prix In Khanty-Manskiysk. Same as before Russian player put a lot of pressure on her opponent but once again Batchimeg showed good defensive skills and managed to hold the position.

In order to complicate things White sacrificed a pawn on a5 even it was not so clear if she has enough compensation. Nevertheless Black found another way to keep the balance and after 45 moves the game finished in a draw.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Ju Wenjun

It was a very interesting and complex game with many different opportunities for both sides. Ju Wenjun played aggressively on the King’s side but her opponent kept calm till some moment and was holding the pressure. The game became extremely sharp after 23…f5, and every move was crucial. One of the critical moments happened on move 24 when Zhu Chen decided to change her dark square bishop for the knight. Ju Wenjun continued to fight for initiative and in the time trouble it seemed more difficult for White to find the exact moves.

Harika Dronavalli 1-0 Nafisa Muminova

Harika tried to avoid theoretical lines today and didn’t get anything out of the opening. As she pointed out at the press conference, she was not happy with her play at the early stage of the game and after 17…f5 and 18…c5 she estimated her position as slightly worse. It’s hard to say how Black could have improved her play but as in the previous game Harika showed better understanding of the position. She competently changed few pieces and started to play against black weaknesses. When Nafisa moved her queen on the Queen’s side Harika used a chance to create crashing attack on the weak king of her opponent. 

Official website

Photo Gallery

Cross table after Round 2




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

SportAccord Mind Games 2014: Final Selection of Players



FIDE publishes the list of players who have been selected to participate in the SportAccord Mind Games 2014:

1. MEN

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 13300474 Aronian, Levon ARM GM 1982 2822.7 2805 2850 2813 4126025 Grischuk, Alexander RUS GM 1983 2800.3 2795 2778 2828 4168119 Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS GM 1990 2793.7 2730 2880 2771 14109603 Karjakin, Sergey RUS GM 1990 2774.7 2786 2732 2806 13401319 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE GM 1985 2768.7 2743 2824 2739 623539 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA GM 1990 2757.0 2766 2777 2728 14100010 Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR GM 1969 2755.3 2735 2720 2811 3503240 Dominguez Perez, Leinier CUB GM 1983 2750.3 2760 2728 2763 14103320 Ponomariov, Ruslan UKR GM 1983 2739.7 2723 2758 2738 13400924 Radjabov, Teimour AZE GM 1987 2738.3 2724 2715 2776 2805677 Gelfand, Boris ISR GM 1968 2732.3 2753 2719 2725 703303 Leko, Peter HUN GM 1979 2730.7 2737 2682 2773 605506 Bacrot, Etienne FRA GM 1983 2730.0 2720 2739 2731 24116068 Giri, Anish NED GM 1994 2727.0 2750 2757 2674 8601429 Wang, Yue CHN GM 1987 2720.7 2715 2682 2765 8602883 Wang, Hao CHN GM 1989 2714.3 2730 2694 2719

No more than two players from each federation have been selected with exceptions made for World Champions 2013 and
2014 for Rapid and Blitz.

Top Reserves in case replacements for Russian players are needed:

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 4102142 Svidler, Peter RUS GM 1976 2766.7 2751 2756 2793 4116992 Morozevich, Alexander RUS GM 1977 2751.3 2731 2750 2773


Top Reserves in case replacements from other federations are needed:

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 1118358 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL GM 1987 2720.0 2733 2743 2684 5007003 Harikrishna, P. IND GM 1986 2718.3 2726 2728 2701



2. WOMEN

ID Number Name Fed Tit B-day AvgRtg Standard Blitz Rapid 8602980 Hou, Yifan CHN GM 1994 2630.3 2629 2662 2600 14111330 Muzychuk, Anna UKR GM 1990 2590.7 2561 2665 2546 5008123 Koneru, Humpy IND GM 1987 2581.7 2613 2521 2611 13601903 Dzagnidze, Nana GEO GM 1987 2559.7 2541 2591 2547 4128125 Kosteniuk, Alexandra RUS GM 1984 2552.7 2533 2548 2577 2902257 Stefanova, Antoaneta BUL GM 1979 2545.0 2488 2569 2578 4167570 Gunina, Valentina RUS GM 1989 2543.3 2501 2577 2552 8601283 Zhao, Xue CHN GM 1985 2534.3 2542 2576 2485 8603006 Ju, Wenjun CHN WGM 1991 2520.7 2538 2469 2555 4133471 Kosintseva, Tatiana RUS GM 1986 2519.7 2476 2578 2505 4641833 Paehtz, Elisabeth GER IM 1985 2487.7 2456 2522 2485 5015197 Harika, Dronavalli IND GM 1991 2486.3 2513 2525 2421 14110911 Ushenina, Anna UKR GM 1985 2481.3 2488 2467 2489 14114550 Muzychuk, Mariya UKR IM 1992 2468.3 2521 2439 2445 13602640 Khotenashvili, Bela GEO GM 1988 2461.0 2518 2447 2418 1700030 Cramling, Pia SWE GM 1963 2455.7 2491 2433 2443



The list occurred automatically based on the received contracts.

List of titles approved by the Presidential Board



FIDE is publishing the list of titles approved by the Presidential Board.


  GM       Zilka, Stepan CZE     Glud, Jakob Vang DEN     Shoker, Samy EGY     Arribas Lopez, Angel ESP     Riff, Jean-Noel FRA     Bromberger, Stefan GER     Stern, Rene GER     Dambacher, Martijn NED     Rozum, Ivan RUS     Bagrationi, Alexander UKR     Bernadskiy, Vitaliy UKR     Nguyen, Huynh Minh Huy VIE             WGM       Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra BIH     Fomina, Tatyana EST     Duisenova, Madina KAZ     Enkhtuul, Altanulzii MGL     Seps, Monika SUI     Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung VIE             IM       Ikeda, Junta AUS     Sardana, Rishi AUS     Smirnov, Anton AUS     Rooze, Jan BEL     Chu, Wei Chao CHN     Li, Bo CHN     Liu, Gianchu CHN     Wang, Yiye CHN     Leyva Rivera, Yunier CUB     Olivia Castaned, Kevel CUB     Quesada Perez, Yasser CUB     Quesada Vera, Liordis CUB     Adair, James R. ENG     Roberson, Peter T. ENG     Santos Latasa, Jaime ESP     Suarez Real, Alberto ESP     Ebeling, Daniel FIN     Ider, Borya FRA     Baldauf, Marco GER     Dausch, Rene GER     Figura, Atila Gajo GER     Graf, Felix GER     Krassowizkij, Jaroslaw GER     Lampert, Jonas GER     Mons, Leon GER     Gledura, Benjamin HUN     Kantor, Gergely HUN     Korpa, Bence HUN     Sunilduth Lyna, Narayan IND     Noroozi, Omid IRI     Pourramezanali, Amirreza IRI     Saiyn, Zhanat KAZ     Daulyte, Deimante LTU     Sanchez Enriquez, Oscar MEX     Van de Griendt, Jan Willem NED     Van Foreest, Jorden NED     Van Wessel, Rudy NED     Pascua, Haridas PHI     Weichhold, Pawel POL     L'Ami, Alina ROU     Cawdery, Daniel RSA     Kashlinskaya, Alina RUS     Mokshanov, Alexey RUS     Sychev, Klementy RUS     Usmanov, Vasily RUS     Stankovic, Milos SRB     Zajic, Milan SRB     Loetscher, Roland SUI     Westerberg, Jonathan SWE     Yilmazyerli, Mert TUR     Bortnik, Nikolay UKR     Grinev, Valeriy UKR     Vetoshko, Volodymyr UKR     Korley, Kassa USA     Lee, Michael USA     Nagle, Sean USA             WIM       Mammadzada, Gunay AZE     Tammert, Iamze GER     Dordzhieva, Dinara RUS     Frisk, Ellinor SWE     Odnorozhenko, Kateryna UKR     Kurbonboeva, Sarvinoz UZB             IA       Ouaret, Fatsah ALG     Krassnitzer, Franz AUT     Lieb, Daniel AUT     Rudd, Jack ENG     Garcia Valer, Jesus ESP     Martinez Hernandez, Noemi ESP     Kolk, Marek EST     Hendrich, Daniel GER     Ricca, Roberto ITA     Uteshev, Arsen KAZ     Baltrunas, Arvydas LTU     Haro Covarrubias, Tizoc MEX     Drugov, Pavel RUS     Chan, Peng Khoon Gerald SIN     Savic, Natasa SRB     Cherif, Mondher TUN     Jemai, Akram TUN     Al Naimi, Hend UAE     Bu Khateer, Reem UAE     Hadi, Salwa UAE     Hassan, Ali UAE     Reed, Boyd USA     Turdialieva, Tahmina UZB             FA
      Harir, Mohamed Sofiane ALG     Sandler, Leonid AUS     Hametner, Gerald AUT     Jabbarov, Eldar AZE     Sideifzade, Fikret I AZE     Azevedo, Maurilio BRA     Lot, Adriana Padovani BRA     Barrios Lara, Adolfo Gerardo CHI     Birk, Bojan CRO     Fandino Reyes, Roquelina CUB     Ortiz, Nelson DOM     Omar, Ashraf EGY     Omar, Mohamed EGY     Carr, Matthew ENG     Gliddon, Daniel J ENG     Thomas, David R ENG     Canabate Domech, Francisco ESP     Lorenzo, Alfredo ESP     Nassar, Askold EST     Casier, Fabrice FRA     Doucet, Antoine FRA     Lapeyre, Pierre FRA     Minaud, Olivier FRA     Pierrot, Philippe FRA     Pouchon, Mickael FRA     Rapin, Florian FRA     Sauve, Philippe FRA     Nikoladze, Sopio GEO     Gerontopoulos, Prodromos GRE     Koutsogiannopoulou, Theodora GRE     Supriyono, Eko INA     Anil Kumar, Raizada IND     Arvind, Mhamal IND     Babita, B. IND     Biswanath, Banerjee IND     Krishnarao, Somanath IND     Raval Dilipkumar, Tribhovandas IND     Sathiesh, G. G. IND     Teli, Rajendra IND     Vidya, Gururaj IND     Heydarian, Hadi IRI     Saba, Iraj IRI     Yaacobovich, Shlomi ISR     Miller, Donald JAM     Kim, Sergey KAZ     Domarkaite, Laima LTU     Radzickas, Vaidas LTU     Vaznonis, Donatas LTU     Bargan, Sergei MDA     Bargan, Svetlana MDA     Bolio Zapata, Edwin David MEX     Nevarez Mills, Carlos Mario MEX     Gafner, Evgeny J. RUS     Malin, Denis RUS     Potapenko, Alexey RUS     Reshetnikov, Evgeny RUS     Ryzhkov, Vjacheslav RUS     Li, Jingfeng SIN     Jurcisin, Imrich SVK     Puchart, Vladimir SVK     Annageldyev, Orazly TKM     Ben Fredj, Jawhar TUN     Mansour, Al Tamimi UAE     Mansour, Mariam UAE     Bogachov, Olekseii UKR     Prohorov, Olexandr UKR     Ablyazimov, Shevket UZB     Khaydarov, Abbos UZB     Vahidov, Tair UZB     Diaz, Geber Eloy VEN     Gonzalez, Jose Luis VEN     Sanchez Castillo, Sarai Carolina VEN             FA from FIDE Arbiters' Seminars       Babamusta, Elton ALB     Collaku, Marin ALB     Culi, Ermal ALB     Driza, Arta ALB     Giergji, Rozana ALB     Gjoni, Eraldo ALB     Hoxha, Lavderim ALB     Truong, Paul CAM     George Githui Wanjiku KEN     Paras, Gudka KEN     Al Wadhahi Musallam OMA     Huang, Jimmy Ching-Chih  TPE             IO       Zerdali, Samir ALG     Barnes, Lara AL ENG     Alt, Ralph GER     Chan, Kwai Keong HKG     Skurygin, Anton KAZ     Al Otaibi, Yaser Motlaq KSA     Al Azmi, Khalaf KUW     Al Khateeb Taher KUW     Ozolins, Aris  LAT     Pilinkus, Donatas LTU     Amazzal, Mustapha MAR     Jurgensen, Graham RSA     Gallus, Matthias SUI     Jemai, Akram TUN     Miladi, Chaher Eddine TUN                     CONDITIONAL ON RTG               GM       Guidarelli, Laurent FRA     Akbaev, Kazbek RUS             IM       Larduet Despaigne, Carlos CUB     Lerch, Patrice FRA     Fruebing, Stefan GER     Sean, Winshand Cuhendi INA     Pak, Evgeniy KAZ     Draskovic, Luka MNE     Getz, Alec USA     Shen, Artur USA             WIM       Khalafova, Narmin AZE          

Download the LIST OF NEW TRAINERS' TITLES approved by the Presidential Board.

List of titles approved by the 85th FIDE Congress in Tromso, Norway



FIDE is publishing the list of titles approved by the 85th FIDE Congress held in Tromso, Norway on 4-15 August 2014.

  GM       Zilka, Stepan CZE     Glud, Jakob Vang DEN     Shoker, Samy EGY     Arribas Lopez, Angel ESP     Riff, Jean-Noel FRA     Bromberger, Stefan GER     Stern, Rene GER     Dambacher, Martijn NED     Rozum, Ivan RUS     Bagrationi, Alexander UKR     Bernadskiy, Vitaliy UKR     Nguyen, Huynh Minh Huy VIE             WGM       Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra BIH     Fomina, Tatyana EST     Duisenova, Madina KAZ     Enkhtuul, Altanulzii MGL     Seps, Monika SUI     Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung VIE             IM       Ikeda, Junta AUS     Sardana, Rishi AUS     Smirnov, Anton AUS     Rooze, Jan BEL     Chu, Wei Chao CHN     Li, Bo CHN     Liu, Gianchu CHN     Wang, Yiye CHN     Leyva Rivera, Yunier CUB     Olivia Castaned, Kevel CUB     Quesada Perez, Yasser CUB     Quesada Vera, Liordis CUB     Adair, James R. ENG     Roberson, Peter T. ENG     Santos Latasa, Jaime ESP     Suarez Real, Alberto ESP     Ebeling, Daniel FIN     Ider, Borya FRA     Baldauf, Marco GER     Dausch, Rene GER     Figura, Atila Gajo GER     Graf, Felix GER     Krassowizkij, Jaroslaw GER     Lampert, Jonas GER     Mons, Leon GER     Gledura, Benjamin HUN     Kantor, Gergely HUN     Korpa, Bence HUN     Sunilduth Lyna, Narayan IND     Noroozi, Omid IRI     Pourramezanali, Amirreza IRI     Saiyn, Zhanat KAZ     Daulyte, Deimante LTU     Sanchez Enriquez, Oscar MEX     Van de Griendt, Jan Willem NED     Van Foreest, Jorden NED     Van Wessel, Rudy NED     Pascua, Haridas PHI     Weichhold, Pawel POL     L'Ami, Alina ROU     Cawdery, Daniel RSA     Kashlinskaya, Alina RUS     Mokshanov, Alexey RUS     Sychev, Klementy RUS     Usmanov, Vasily RUS     Stankovic, Milos SRB     Zajic, Milan SRB     Loetscher, Roland SUI     Westerberg, Jonathan SWE     Yilmazyerli, Mert TUR     Bortnik, Nikolay UKR     Grinev, Valeriy UKR     Vetoshko, Volodymyr UKR     Korley, Kassa USA     Lee, Michael USA     Nagle, Sean USA             WIM       Mammadzada, Gunay AZE     Tammert, Iamze GER     Dordzhieva, Dinara RUS     Frisk, Ellinor SWE     Odnorozhenko, Kateryna UKR     Kurbonboeva, Sarvinoz UZB             IA       Ouaret, Fatsah ALG     Krassnitzer, Franz AUT     Lieb, Daniel AUT     Rudd, Jack ENG     Garcia Valer, Jesus ESP     Martinez Hernandez, Noemi ESP     Kolk, Marek EST     Hendrich, Daniel GER     Ricca, Roberto ITA     Uteshev, Arsen KAZ     Baltrunas, Arvydas LTU     Haro Covarrubias, Tizoc MEX     Drugov, Pavel RUS     Chan, Peng Khoon Gerald SIN     Savic, Natasa SRB     Cherif, Mondher TUN     Jemai, Akram TUN     Al Naimi, Hend UAE     Bu Khateer, Reem UAE     Hadi, Salwa UAE     Hassan, Ali UAE     Reed, Boyd USA     Turdialieva, Tahmina UZB             FA
      Harir, Mohamed Sofiane ALG     Sandler, Leonid AUS     Hametner, Gerald AUT     Jabbarov, Eldar AZE     Sideifzade, Fikret I AZE     Azevedo, Maurilio BRA     Lot, Adriana Padovani BRA     Barrios Lara, Adolfo Gerardo CHI     Birk, Bojan CRO     Fandino Reyes, Roquelina CUB     Ortiz, Nelson DOM     Omar, Ashraf EGY     Omar, Mohamed EGY     Carr, Matthew ENG     Gliddon, Daniel J ENG     Thomas, David R ENG     Canabate Domech, Francisco ESP     Lorenzo, Alfredo ESP     Nassar, Askold EST     Casier, Fabrice FRA     Doucet, Antoine FRA     Lapeyre, Pierre FRA     Minaud, Olivier FRA     Pierrot, Philippe FRA     Pouchon, Mickael FRA     Rapin, Florian FRA     Sauve, Philippe FRA     Nikoladze, Sopio GEO     Gerontopoulos, Prodromos GRE     Koutsogiannopoulou, Theodora GRE     Supriyono, Eko INA     Anil Kumar, Raizada IND     Arvind, Mhamal IND     Babita, B. IND     Biswanath, Banerjee IND     Krishnarao, Somanath IND     Raval Dilipkumar, Tribhovandas IND     Sathiesh, G. G. IND     Teli, Rajendra IND     Vidya, Gururaj IND     Heydarian, Hadi IRI     Saba, Iraj IRI     Yaacobovich, Shlomi ISR     Miller, Donald JAM     Kim, Sergey KAZ     Domarkaite, Laima LTU     Radzickas, Vaidas LTU     Vaznonis, Donatas LTU     Bargan, Sergei MDA     Bargan, Svetlana MDA     Bolio Zapata, Edwin David MEX     Nevarez Mills, Carlos Mario MEX     Gafner, Evgeny J. RUS     Malin, Denis RUS     Potapenko, Alexey RUS     Reshetnikov, Evgeny RUS     Ryzhkov, Vjacheslav RUS     Li, Jingfeng SIN     Jurcisin, Imrich SVK     Puchart, Vladimir SVK     Annageldyev, Orazly TKM     Ben Fredj, Jawhar TUN     Mansour, Al Tamimi UAE     Mansour, Mariam UAE     Bogachov, Olekseii UKR     Prohorov, Olexandr UKR     Ablyazimov, Shevket UZB     Khaydarov, Abbos UZB     Vahidov, Tair UZB     Diaz, Geber Eloy VEN     Gonzalez, Jose Luis VEN     Sanchez Castillo, Sarai Carolina VEN             FA from FIDE Arbiters' Seminars       Babamusta, Elton ALB     Collaku, Marin ALB     Culi, Ermal ALB     Driza, Arta ALB     Giergji, Rozana ALB     Gjoni, Eraldo ALB     Hoxha, Lavderim ALB     Truong, Paul CAM     George Githui Wanjiku KEN     Paras, Gudka KEN     Al Wadhahi Musallam OMA     Huang, Jimmy Ching-Chih  TPE             IO       Zerdali, Samir ALG     Barnes, Lara AL ENG     Alt, Ralph GER     Chan, Kwai Keong HKG     Skurygin, Anton KAZ     Al Otaibi, Yaser Motlaq KSA     Al Azmi, Khalaf KUW     Al Khateeb Taher KUW     Ozolins, Aris  LAT     Pilinkus, Donatas LTU     Amazzal, Mustapha MAR     Jurgensen, Graham RSA     Gallus, Matthias SUI     Jemai, Akram TUN     Miladi, Chaher Eddine TUN                     CONDITIONAL ON RTG               GM       Guidarelli, Laurent FRA     Akbaev, Kazbek RUS             IM       Larduet Despaigne, Carlos CUB     Lerch, Patrice FRA     Fruebing, Stefan GER     Sean, Winshand Cuhendi INA     Pak, Evgeniy KAZ     Draskovic, Luka MNE     Getz, Alec USA     Shen, Artur USA             WIM       Khalafova, Narmin AZE          

Download the LIST OF NEW TRAINERS' TITLES approved by the 85th FIDE Congress 2014.

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 4



Round 4: Ju Wenjun takes lead


In a dramatic fourth round Ju Wenjun beat Elina Danielian to grab solo lead with 3½ points in the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. In the battle of the two top seeds, Hou Yifan, playing black, defeated Humpy Koneru, who unexpectedly lost the drawish endgame. Tatiana Kosintseva had winning position against Nafisa Muminova but missed advantage in the time trouble. The game finished in a draw same as another encounter between Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue. Another drama happened in the game Zhu Chen – Batchimeg Tuvshintugs. Qatari player had better position during the whole game but didn’t play well in the rook endgame and even lost the game at the end. Alina L’Ami suffered another loss, this time against Anna Ushenina. Women’s World Champion Hou Yifan of China, Harika Dronavalli of India, former women’s world champion Anna Ushenina of Ukraine and WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs of Mongolia follow the leader with 3 points each.


Ju Wenjun 1-0 Elina Danielian

Humpy Koneru 0-1 Hou Yifan

Anna Ushenina 1-0 Alina L’Ami

Zhu Chen 0-1 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Zhao Xue 1/2-1/2 Harika Dronavalli

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Nafisa Muminova

RESULTS after Round 4

Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery


Round 3: Harika Dronavalli and Ju Wenjun are leading


Ju Wenjun defeated her compatriot Zhao Xue today to catch up Harika Dronavalli, who made a draw against World Champion Hou Yifan. Humpy Koneru and Nafisa Muminova played a dramatic game, which finished in a draw but not before both players missed good chances to win. Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Anna Ushenina played a relatively quiet game and split a point just before the first time control. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen lost the third game in a row against Tatiana Kosintseva and Elina Danielian respectively.

Ju Wenjun 1-0 Zhao Xue

Danielian, Elina 1-0 Zhu Chen

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Kosintseva, Tatiana

Muminova, Nafisa ½-½ Koneru Humpy

Hou Yifan ½-½ Dronavalli Harika


Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery




Round 2: Harika Dronavalli takes early lead

Harika Dronavalli from India defeated Nafisa Muminova from Uzbekistan to become the sole leader after two rounds of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. Her compatriot Humpy Koneru managed to recover after unfortunate start and confidently won against Alina L’Ami. There were two more decisive games as Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun outplayed Elina Danielian and Zhu Chen respectively. Hou Yifan split a point with Zhao Xue and one more game between Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Tatiana Kosintseva also finished in a draw. Five players including Hou Yifan, Zhao Xue, Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun are half a point behind the leader.

Zhao Xue 1/2 – 1/2 Hou Yifan

The Chinese derby didn’t last for too long today and after one hour of play the peace has been signed. The theoretical line led to a known repetition and both players seemed satisfied with the final result. Speaking about interest of Chinese media towards Women Grand Prix event, Hou Yifan pointed out that after such a great success of Chinese Team at the Olympiad the attention of media turned to chess once again and Grand Prix event will be followed closely in China. At the same time both players of Chinese Women’s Team seemed unsatisfied with their own result in Tromso. “We have good chances to win this Olympiad as well as a previous one but for some reason we are always second”, said Zhao Xue.

Humpy Koneru 1-0 Alina L’Ami

It ‘s not an easy task to play against two best Indian women players in two days and Alina L’Ami suffered another loss today. There was an opportunity for Romanian player to exchange her knight for White’s light-square bishop but all the same Black got solid position after the opening. The critical moment of this game was perhaps at move 26 when Black didn’t play 26…Ne2 allowing her opponent to win an important pawn on the King’s side. It was just a question of technique from Humpy Koneru and she didn’t give any chance to her opponent.

Ushenina Anna 1-0 Elina Danielian

Anna Ushenina and Elina Danielian could have finished the game around 30th move but both players missed 30.g4 in the time trouble.

However the position was still in White’s favor but Danielian found the right moment to complicate the position after a piece sacrifice. Black managed to get 3 pawns for one piece, and in fact at one moment Black could draw the game with a nice move but failed to find the precise way.

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Once again Tatiana tried her luck in Ruy Lopez against Batchimeg but this time she chose 5.Bc6 comapere to 5.c3 as she played in the previous stage of Grand Prix In Khanty-Manskiysk. Same as before Russian player put a lot of pressure on her opponent but once again Batchimeg showed good defensive skills and managed to hold the position.

In order to complicate things White sacrificed a pawn on a5 even it was not so clear if she has enough compensation. Nevertheless Black found another way to keep the balance and after 45 moves the game finished in a draw.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Ju Wenjun

It was a very interesting and complex game with many different opportunities for both sides. Ju Wenjun played aggressively on the King’s side but her opponent kept calm till some moment and was holding the pressure. The game became extremely sharp after 23…f5, and every move was crucial. One of the critical moments happened on move 24 when Zhu Chen decided to change her dark square bishop for the knight. Ju Wenjun continued to fight for initiative and in the time trouble it seemed more difficult for White to find the exact moves.

Harika Dronavalli 1-0 Nafisa Muminova

Harika tried to avoid theoretical lines today and didn’t get anything out of the opening. As she pointed out at the press conference, she was not happy with her play at the early stage of the game and after 17…f5 and 18…c5 she estimated her position as slightly worse. It’s hard to say how Black could have improved her play but as in the previous game Harika showed better understanding of the position. She competently changed few pieces and started to play against black weaknesses. When Nafisa moved her queen on the Queen’s side Harika used a chance to create crashing attack on the weak king of her opponent. 

Official website

Photo Gallery

Cross table after Round 2




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 3



Round 3: Harika Dronavalli and Ju Wenjun are leading


Ju Wenjun defeated her compatriot Zhao Xue today to catch up Harika Dronavalli, who made a draw against World Champion Hou Yifan. Humpy Koneru and Nafisa Muminova played a dramatic game, which finished in a draw but not before both players missed good chances to win. Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Anna Ushenina played a relatively quiet game and split a point just before the first time control. Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen lost the third game in a row against Tatiana Kosintseva and Elina Danielian respectively.

Ju Wenjun 1-0 Zhao Xue

Danielian, Elina 1-0 Zhu Chen

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Kosintseva, Tatiana

Muminova, Nafisa ½-½ Koneru Humpy

Hou Yifan ½-½ Dronavalli Harika


Read full report at the official website

Photo Gallery




Round 2: Harika Dronavalli takes early lead

Harika Dronavalli from India defeated Nafisa Muminova from Uzbekistan to become the sole leader after two rounds of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. Her compatriot Humpy Koneru managed to recover after unfortunate start and confidently won against Alina L’Ami. There were two more decisive games as Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun outplayed Elina Danielian and Zhu Chen respectively. Hou Yifan split a point with Zhao Xue and one more game between Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Tatiana Kosintseva also finished in a draw. Five players including Hou Yifan, Zhao Xue, Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun are half a point behind the leader.

Zhao Xue 1/2 – 1/2 Hou Yifan

The Chinese derby didn’t last for too long today and after one hour of play the peace has been signed. The theoretical line led to a known repetition and both players seemed satisfied with the final result. Speaking about interest of Chinese media towards Women Grand Prix event, Hou Yifan pointed out that after such a great success of Chinese Team at the Olympiad the attention of media turned to chess once again and Grand Prix event will be followed closely in China. At the same time both players of Chinese Women’s Team seemed unsatisfied with their own result in Tromso. “We have good chances to win this Olympiad as well as a previous one but for some reason we are always second”, said Zhao Xue.

Humpy Koneru 1-0 Alina L’Ami

It ‘s not an easy task to play against two best Indian women players in two days and Alina L’Ami suffered another loss today. There was an opportunity for Romanian player to exchange her knight for White’s light-square bishop but all the same Black got solid position after the opening. The critical moment of this game was perhaps at move 26 when Black didn’t play 26…Ne2 allowing her opponent to win an important pawn on the King’s side. It was just a question of technique from Humpy Koneru and she didn’t give any chance to her opponent.

Ushenina Anna 1-0 Elina Danielian

Anna Ushenina and Elina Danielian could have finished the game around 30th move but both players missed 30.g4 in the time trouble.

However the position was still in White’s favor but Danielian found the right moment to complicate the position after a piece sacrifice. Black managed to get 3 pawns for one piece, and in fact at one moment Black could draw the game with a nice move but failed to find the precise way.

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Once again Tatiana tried her luck in Ruy Lopez against Batchimeg but this time she chose 5.Bc6 comapere to 5.c3 as she played in the previous stage of Grand Prix In Khanty-Manskiysk. Same as before Russian player put a lot of pressure on her opponent but once again Batchimeg showed good defensive skills and managed to hold the position.

In order to complicate things White sacrificed a pawn on a5 even it was not so clear if she has enough compensation. Nevertheless Black found another way to keep the balance and after 45 moves the game finished in a draw.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Ju Wenjun

It was a very interesting and complex game with many different opportunities for both sides. Ju Wenjun played aggressively on the King’s side but her opponent kept calm till some moment and was holding the pressure. The game became extremely sharp after 23…f5, and every move was crucial. One of the critical moments happened on move 24 when Zhu Chen decided to change her dark square bishop for the knight. Ju Wenjun continued to fight for initiative and in the time trouble it seemed more difficult for White to find the exact moves.

Harika Dronavalli 1-0 Nafisa Muminova

Harika tried to avoid theoretical lines today and didn’t get anything out of the opening. As she pointed out at the press conference, she was not happy with her play at the early stage of the game and after 17…f5 and 18…c5 she estimated her position as slightly worse. It’s hard to say how Black could have improved her play but as in the previous game Harika showed better understanding of the position. She competently changed few pieces and started to play against black weaknesses. When Nafisa moved her queen on the Queen’s side Harika used a chance to create crashing attack on the weak king of her opponent. 

Official website

Photo Gallery

Cross table after Round 2




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

General Assembly 2014 Decisions



Decisions
General Assembly 2014
11-14 August 2014
Tromso, Norway


GA-2014/1. To discharge the Treasurer. The new Treasurer is Dr. Adrian Siegel. 

GA-2014/2. To re-appoint Ernst & Young as FIDE External Auditors.

GA-2014/3. To elect the FIDE President with his ticket, 5 Vice-Presidents, Chairmen and members of the Ethics and Constitutional Commissions and members of the Verification Commission.

GA-2014/4. To appoint Mr. Nigel Freeman as Executive Director.

GA-2014/5. To award the organization of the World Schools Individual Championship 2016 to Tunisia.

GA-2014/6. To approve the organization of an event they choose for 2016 for the Romanian Chess Federation.

GA-2014/7. To award the organization of the 2014 U16 Chess Olympiad to the Hungarian Chess Federation, 12-22nd December.

GA-2014/8. To organize the Women’s World Team Championship in Chengdu, China, 18-29 April 2015.

GA-2014/9. To create an Online Commission, Marketing Committee and Skills Management Committee.

GA-2014/10. To award the organization of World Chess Olympiad 2018 to Georgian Chess Federation, to organize the event in Batumi, 1-15 September 2018.

GA-2014/11. To make additions to the Anti-Doping Regulations.

GA-2014/12. To turn Disabled Committee into Disabled Commission.

GA-2014/13. To organize the 2016 World Junior and Girls U-20 Championship in India.

GA-2014/14. To approve President’s nominations for Commission Chairmen and other FIDE offices.

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 2




Round 2: Harika Dronavalli takes early lead

Harika Dronavalli from India defeated Nafisa Muminova from Uzbekistan to become the sole leader after two rounds of the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. Her compatriot Humpy Koneru managed to recover after unfortunate start and confidently won against Alina L’Ami. There were two more decisive games as Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun outplayed Elina Danielian and Zhu Chen respectively. Hou Yifan split a point with Zhao Xue and one more game between Batchimeg Tuvshintugs and Tatiana Kosintseva also finished in a draw. Five players including Hou Yifan, Zhao Xue, Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, Anna Ushenina and Ju Wenjun are half a point behind the leader.

Zhao Xue 1/2 – 1/2 Hou Yifan

The Chinese derby didn’t last for too long today and after one hour of play the peace has been signed. The theoretical line led to a known repetition and both players seemed satisfied with the final result. Speaking about interest of Chinese media towards Women Grand Prix event, Hou Yifan pointed out that after such a great success of Chinese Team at the Olympiad the attention of media turned to chess once again and Grand Prix event will be followed closely in China. At the same time both players of Chinese Women’s Team seemed unsatisfied with their own result in Tromso. “We have good chances to win this Olympiad as well as a previous one but for some reason we are always second”, said Zhao Xue.

Humpy Koneru 1-0 Alina L’Ami

It ‘s not an easy task to play against two best Indian women players in two days and Alina L’Ami suffered another loss today. There was an opportunity for Romanian player to exchange her knight for White’s light-square bishop but all the same Black got solid position after the opening. The critical moment of this game was perhaps at move 26 when Black didn’t play 26…Ne2 allowing her opponent to win an important pawn on the King’s side. It was just a question of technique from Humpy Koneru and she didn’t give any chance to her opponent.

Ushenina Anna 1-0 Elina Danielian

Anna Ushenina and Elina Danielian could have finished the game around 30th move but both players missed 30.g4 in the time trouble.

However the position was still in White’s favor but Danielian found the right moment to complicate the position after a piece sacrifice. Black managed to get 3 pawns for one piece, and in fact at one moment Black could draw the game with a nice move but failed to find the precise way.

Tatiana Kosintseva 1/2-1/2 Batchimeg Tuvshintugs

Once again Tatiana tried her luck in Ruy Lopez against Batchimeg but this time she chose 5.Bc6 comapere to 5.c3 as she played in the previous stage of Grand Prix In Khanty-Manskiysk. Same as before Russian player put a lot of pressure on her opponent but once again Batchimeg showed good defensive skills and managed to hold the position.

In order to complicate things White sacrificed a pawn on a5 even it was not so clear if she has enough compensation. Nevertheless Black found another way to keep the balance and after 45 moves the game finished in a draw.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Ju Wenjun

It was a very interesting and complex game with many different opportunities for both sides. Ju Wenjun played aggressively on the King’s side but her opponent kept calm till some moment and was holding the pressure. The game became extremely sharp after 23…f5, and every move was crucial. One of the critical moments happened on move 24 when Zhu Chen decided to change her dark square bishop for the knight. Ju Wenjun continued to fight for initiative and in the time trouble it seemed more difficult for White to find the exact moves.

Harika Dronavalli 1-0 Nafisa Muminova

Harika tried to avoid theoretical lines today and didn’t get anything out of the opening. As she pointed out at the press conference, she was not happy with her play at the early stage of the game and after 17…f5 and 18…c5 she estimated her position as slightly worse. It’s hard to say how Black could have improved her play but as in the previous game Harika showed better understanding of the position. She competently changed few pieces and started to play against black weaknesses. When Nafisa moved her queen on the Queen’s side Harika used a chance to create crashing attack on the weak king of her opponent. 

Official website

Photo Gallery

Cross table after Round 2




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

Sharjah Women’s Grand Prix: Round 1




Round 1

The sixth stage of FIDE Women Grand Prix in Sharjah started on 25th of August with four decisive games and two draws.

Most of the players playing the black pieces were higher rated than their opponents, and three out of four decisive games finished in Black’s favor. Humpy Koneru, one of the challengers for the victory in Grand Prix series, blundered material and lost her first game against Batchimeg Tuvshintugs, while Hou Yifan confidently outplayed Nafisa Muminova. Harika Dronavalli and Zhao Xue managed to win after long resistance from their opponents Alina L’Ami and Zhu Chen respectively. Elina Danielian and Anna Ushenina had good chances to finish their games with victories but their opponents Tatiana Kosintseva and Ju Wenjun managed to avoid serious troubles and both games ended in draws.

Muminova, Nafisa 0-1 Hou Yifan

Hou Yifan obtained quite comfortable position due to some inaccuracies made by her opponent and was slowly improving her position looking for the right moment to break through on the King’s side. White didn’t find real chances to find any counter play and after 32…g5 Muminova’s position became hopeless.

Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg 1-0 Koneru Humpy

Mongolian player decided to give up the bishop for the knight and ended up in the worse position. Humpy Koneru had many different options to increase her advantage but preferred to enter the position with two rooks for a queen with better chances for Black. According to Koneru she could have slowly increased the position of her pieces but instead she lost her track and blundered the material. Just one move earlier Black could have forced a draw by three times repetition.

Zhu Chen 0-1 Zhao Xue

Zhao Xue managed to equalize with black and grabbed a pawn on a2 due to her opponent’s mistake. Nevertheless, White got a positional compensation by activating her pieces. Black has to give a pawn back and the position was balanced but luckily for Zhao Xue, Zhu Chen made inaccurate moves 31.b4 and 32.e4. Chinese player confidently converted her advantage into full point.

Ju Wenjun ½-½ Ushenina, Anna

The game between Ju Wenjun and Anna Ushenina ended in a draw, but not before Ukrainian player had had a promising position. Ju Wenjun played inaccurately in the opening and ended up in the position with an isolated pawn. Anna Ushenina used a typical plan for this kind of positions and it was White’s turn to look for equality. At the same time former world champion was not so optimistic about her chances. “White didn’t do anything wrong to be punished”, said Anna during the press conference after the game but her opponent seemed to be happy with a draw. After 30 moves the game was over after three times repetition.

Danielian, Elina ½-½ Kosintseva, Tatiana

Tatiana Kosintseva didn’t expect the line with 7.c5 in Queens Gambit and went for dubious continuation with 7…Ne4. White managed to gain an advantage out of the opening and Tatiana was suffering trying to equalize the position during the whole game. In the endgame Elina Danielian managed to win a pawn but didn’t succeed to convert her advantage in the rook endgame.

l'Ami, Alina 0-1 Dronavalli Harika

It became clear during the press conference that Harika Dronavalli had better knowledge of the position which appeared after the opening. Despite the fact that White had pair of bishops, it was difficult to find the way to make use of them. Harika precisely played against the weakness of the White’s position – hanging pawns, and managed to win one of them. Black converted her advantage in the rook endgame.

And so after the first round the tournament has four leaders. Tuesday, August 26th at 15:00 local time the second round will be played:

Zhao Xue

2508



Hou Yifan

2661

Dronavalli Harika

2521



Muminova, Nafisa

2315

Koneru Humpy

2598



l'Ami, Alina

2446

Kosintseva, Tatiana

2494



Tuvshintugs, Batchimeg

2346

Ushenina, Anna

2487



Danielian, Elina

2490

Zhu Chen

2461



Ju Wenjun

2559

Official website

Photo Gallery

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

The final stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix started in Sharjah



The sixth stage of the women’s FIDE Grand Prix officially opened today in Sharjah Cultural and Chess Club. 12 chess players representing 9 countries of the world will participate in the competition that will take place until the 7th of September 2014. In his speech FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov expressed his gratitude to the organizers and wished all players to show their best in the tournament.



“I am happy to be here in Sharjah in this magnificent Chess Club, the largest in the world chess building, the opening of which in 2013 I was fortunate to attend. I would like to take this occasion to thank one more time His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Quassimi, the ruler of Sharjah, for his decisive contribution into this outstanding architectural and cultural project that resulted in appearance of the top level playing venue together with the Regional FIDE office, which has turned Sharjah into the major chess destinations all over the world. Now Sharjah deservedly hosts the final leg of the Women’s Grand Prix Series, taking the baton from Georgian Lopota alone with other hosting cities of this significant women’s chess event, including here Khanty-Mansiysk in Russia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, Dilijan in Armenia and Geneva in Switzerland. Women’s Grand Prix Series give strong impulse to development of women’s chess and let all of us enjoy tough and nonpresumable chess fights.”

FIDE President promised to announce the hosting city of the Women’s World Chess Championship at the closing ceremony of the Grand Prix in Sharjah on 6th of September.



The big and small cups from “Lobortas Classic Jewelry House” were presented during the opening ceremony of the sixth stage of FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Sharjah. The winner of the Women’s Grand Priz Series will be awarded with the small cup at the closing ceremony. The Classic Jewelry House Lobortas had previously created for FIDE the Large and Small Chess Cups "Caissa". World Champion Hou Yifan was the one who got the award “Caissa” during Istanbul Chess Olympiad in 2012.

FIDE, the World Chess Federation, and Lobortas Classic Jewelry House are to release the men's Grand Prix Series trophy next year. Drawing of lots for the tournament was held during the opening ceremony. So, the pairs of the first round are: 

ROUND 1 Pairings

No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No. 1 2461 GM Zhu Chen vs GM Zhao Xue 2508 12 2 2559 WGM Ju Wenjun vs GM Ushenina Anna 2487 11 3 2490 GM Danielian Elina vs GM Kosintseva Tatiana 2494 10 4 2346 WGM Batchimeg Tuvshintugs vs GM Koneru Humpy 2598 9 5 2446 WGM L'ami Alina vs GM Harika Dronavalli 2521 8 6 2315 WGM Muminova Nafisa vs GM Hou Yifan 2661 7



The Women Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments that are being held over a two year period between 2013 and 2014. 18 top players participate in 4 of these 6 tournaments. The winner of the Grand Prix series will play a ten-game World Championship match with the Women’s World Champion; which will be determined during Women World Championship in the third quarter of 2015.

Official website

FIDE Grand-Prix 2014-2015 Announcement




FIDE announces the full details of the Grand-Prix 2014-2015, from which the first two (2) winners will qualify to the Candidates Tournament of the World Chess Championship Cycle 2014-2016. The schedule of the four events is the following:

a.) 1 - 15 October 2014: Baku, Azerbaijan

b.) 20 October - 3 November 2014: Tashkent, Uzbekistan

c.) 14 - 28 February 2015: Tehran, Iran

d.) 13 - 27 May 2015: Moscow, Russia

In total 16 players will participate, 11 qualifiers as per regulations (listed below) plus 4 nominees from the organisers (to be announced) plus 1 nominee of the FIDE President (to be announced).

The 11 original qualifiers who have to confirm their participation by 27 August 2014 are:

01. Carlsen, Magnus (World Champion)
02. Anand, Wiswanathan (World Ch. match 2013)
03. Kramnik, Vladimir (World Cup winner 2013)
04. Andreikin, Dmitry (World Cup runner-up 2013)
05. Tomashevsky, Evgeny (World Cup semi-finalist 2013)
06. Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime (World Cup semi-finalist 2013)
07. Aronian, Levon (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
08. Caruana, Fabiano (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
09. Grischuk, Alexander (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
10. Nakamura, Hikaru (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
11. Topalov, Veselin (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)

The first reserves for any replacement needed are: 

1. Karjakin, Sergey (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
2. Gelfand, Boris (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014)
3. Mamedyarov, S (Average Rating List 5/2013 to 4/2014).

Each player will play in 3 tournaments and all his results will be taken into account for the overall final standings of the Grand-Prix.
The full regulations of the Grand-Prix 2014-2015 can be downloaded from the FIDE website here: http://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.html?id=31&view=article

The qualified players mentioned above shall download their participation contract from here and return it signed to the FIDE Secretariat, as scanned email or fax, by the deadline of 27 August 2014.

Nominations from the FIDE President




Nominations from the FIDE President


Commissions’ Chairmen

Anti-Cheating Commission: Israel Gelfer
Arbiters Commission: Panagiotis Nikolopoulos
Chess in Schools Commission: Kevin O' Connell
Commission for Women's Chess: Martha Fierro Baquero and Susan Polgar
Commission for World Championships & Olympiads: Georgios Makropoulos
Commission of Chess Journalists: Georgios Makropoulos
Constitutional Commission: Roberto Rivello
Development Commission: Allan Herbert
Events Commission: Boris Kutin
Ethics Commission: Francois Strydom
Medical Commission: Dr. Jana Bellin
Qualification Commission: Werner Stubenvoll
Technical Commission: Bharat Singh
Rules and Tournament Regulations: Ashot Vardapetyan
System of Pairings and Programs: Christian Krause
Social Action Commission: Beatriz Marinello
Social Projects Comission: Darcy Gustavo Machado Vieira Lima
Trainers' Commission: Adrian Mikhalchishin
Verification Commission: Graham Boxall
Online Commission: Michalis Kaloumenos
Disabled Commission: Thomas Luther
Marketing Committee: Diego Salazar
Skills Management Committee: Roberto Mogranzini
Central Board of Commissions: Geoffrey Borg



Chief Executive Officer: Geoffrey Borg
Strategic Planning Director: Emelia Ellappen
FIDE Press Officer: Anastazia Karlovich

President’s Assistants for each Continent:
Asia: Chu Bo
Africa: Lakhdar Mazouz
Americas: Mario Petrucci
Europe: Willy Iclicki

RESULTS OF ECU ELECTIONS



On 11th August, 2014 European Chess Union elections were held in Tromso, Norway. Here are the results:

Elected Presidential ticket:

Zurab Azmaiparashvili – President
Ion-Serban Dobronauteanu – Deputy President
Finnbjorn Vang – Vice President
Theodoros Tsorbatzoglou – Secretary General
Martin Huba – Treasurer

In addition, the three additional Board members were elected:

Adrian Mikhalchishin (SLO)
Johann Pocksteiner (AUT)
Jean-Michel Rapaire (MNC)

The former ECU President Silvio Danailov (BUL) accepted the position of Honorary President in the newly elected ECU Board.

In addition, the ECU General Assembly elected Mr. Aris Ozolins (LAT) as the ECU Auditor. Mr. Branimir Jukic (CRO) was declared as ECU Deputy Auditor.

According to FIDE regulations, Europe will be represented in FIDE Executive Board by its President Mr. Azmaiparashvili, Deputy President Mr. Dobronauteanu and four elected members as follows:

Carl Fredrik Johansson (SWE)
Jean-Claude Moingt (FRA)
Kevin O’Connell (IRL)
Roberto Rivello (ITA)

http://www.ecuonline.net/com/news/single/700.html

RESULTS OF FIDE ELECTIONS



RESULTS OF FIDE ELECTIONS

In addition to the Presidential ticket elections at the FIDE General Assembly in Tromso, Norway, there were a number of other officials elected and nominated.

Elected Presidential ticket:
Kirsan Ilyumzhinov - President
Georgios Makropoulos - Deputy President
Abraham Tolentino - General Secretary
Aguinaldo Jaime - Vice President
Martha Fierro Baquero - Vice President
Adrian Siegel – Treasurer

Nominated Vice Presidents:
Khalifa Mohammed Al-Hitmi (QAT)
Israel Gelfer (ISR)
Yang Junan (CHN)
Boris Kutin (SLO)
Gulkiz Tulay (TUR)

Elected Vice President:
Herbert Bastian (GER)
Andrey Filatov (RUS)
M. J. Kambuzia (IRI)
Beatriz Marinello (CHI)
D.V. Sundar (IND)

Nominated Honorary Vice Presidents:
Javier Ochoa de Echaguen (ESP)
Kurt Jungwirth (AUT)
Vanik Zakarian (ARM)
Mario Ramirez Barajas (MEX)

Elected Chairmen of Commissions:
Ethics Commission – Francois Strydom (RSA)
Constitutional Commission – Roberto Rivello (ITA)


Elected members of Ethics Commission:
Pedro Dominguez
Willi Iclicki
R. Joshi
Ion-Serban Dobronauteanu

Elected members of Constitutional Commission :
Casto Abundo
Predro Dominguez
David Jarett
Willi Iclicki

Elected members of the Verification Commission:
Graham Boxall
Michael Langer
Margaret Murphy

Elected Continental Presidents:
Africa - Lewis Ncube
Americas - Jorge Vega
Asia - Sheikh Sultan Bin Khalifa Al-Nehyan
Europe - Zurab Azmaiparashvili

41st Chess Olympiad Winners



41st Chess Olympiad Winners:

Open section

1. China 19 Match points
2. Hungary 17 Match points
2. India 17 Match points

Women Section

1. Russia 20 Match points
2. China 18 Match points
3 Ukraine 18 Match points



Board Prizes:

Open Section

Board 1

1. Topalov, Veselin (BUL)
2. Adams, Michael (ENG)
3. Giri, Anish (NED)

Board 2
1. Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son (VIE)
2. Balogh, Csaba (HUN)
3. Ding, Liren (CHN)

Board 3
1. Yu, Yangyi (CHN)
2. Sasikiran, Krishnan (IND)
3. Eljanov, Pavel (UKR)

Board 4
1. Sedlak, Nikola (SRB)
2. Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo (CUB)
3. Ni, Hua (CUB)

Board 5
1. Shankland, Samuel L (USA)
2. Moiseenko, Alexander (UKR)
3. Nepomniachtchi, Ian (RUS)

Women Section

Board 1
1. Dzagnidze, Nana (GEO)
2. Hou, Yifan (CHN)
3. Cramling, Pia (SWE)

Board 2
Gunina, Valentina (RUS)
Khotenashvili, Bela (GEO)
Ju, Wenjun (CHN)

Board 3
1. Kosteniuk, Alexandra (RUS)
2. Matnadze, Ana (ESP)
3. Frisk, Ellinor (SWE)

Board 4
1. Zhukova, Natalia (UKR)
2. Bartel, Marta (POL)
3. Bulmaga, Irina (ROU)


Board 5
1. Padmini, Rout (IND)
2. Guo, Qi (CHN)
3. Dauletova, Gulmira (KAZ)


Download and view all Prizes

Olympiad official website 

Photo Gallery




OPEN TEAM MEDALISTS


Gold for China


Silver for Hungary


Bronze for India

WOMEN'S TEAM MEDALISTS


Gold for Russia


Silver for China


Bronze for Ukraine

Pages